Tuesday , July 7th 2020
    Breast Pumps

breastfeeding Pumping breast milk An overview

breastfeeding Pumping breast milk  An overview

PLEASE LIKE SHERE & SUBSCRIBE FOR UPCOMING NEW VIDEOS .Pumping breast milk An overview Why would I need to pump my breast milk? .PLEASE LIKE SHERE & SUBSCRIBE FOR UPCOMING NEW VIDEOS.
The most common reasons to pump are to collect your milk so your baby can have it when you’re not around and to maintain your milk supply for when you’re together. This is important if you’re going back to work but want to continue nursing.

To get the hang of it, it’s a good idea to practice pumping for a few weeks before you need to rely on expressed breast milk for your baby. Just make sure that breastfeeding is well established before you give your baby the bottle.

Pumping also means you don’t have to be on call for every feeding when you’re at home. Your partner (or another helper) can feed your baby your milk from a bottle, allowing you to get more uninterrupted sleep or take a break from baby care. (Letting Dad take over some of the feedings also helps him bond with the baby!)

You can also use a breast pump for these reasons:

To stimulate your milk production and increase your milk supply
To collect milk to feed a premature baby or one who can’t latch on to your breast
To relieve the pain and pressure of engorged breasts – though too much pumping when you’re engorged can make matters worse
To keep your milk supply up if your healthcare provider advises you to stop nursing temporarily because you’re taking medication that might be harmful to your baby (this is rarely necessary) or if you’re hospitalized for a short time and can’t breastfeed throughout the day.
Most women express their milk using an electric or manual pump. Some women prefer to express their milk by hand, but most feel that using a pump is faster and easier.

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